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Bill to Ban Indoor Tanning by Minors Draws Large Crowds, Controv

2015-02-06

Four full panels testified in favor of a bill that would ban minors younger than 18 from the use of tanning facilities, in a standing-room-only chamber of the House Health and Government Operations Committee on Thursday.

This is the third session that Delegate Kirill Reznik, D-Montgomery, has introduced the bill. He said that he intends to help people develop better habits, not to put the tanning industry out of business or be mean to teenagers.

“How often does every medical organization and CareFirst (Medical Health Insurance) line up on the same side of an issue,” he said, citing the extensive support for the legislation banning minors from the “human panini presses.”

Delegate Clarence Lam, D-Baltimore and Howard, testified as a practicing doctor in favor of the bill. UV rays are more potent as a carcinogen to children than to adults, he said.

A 10 percent tax was imposed on tanning services nationwide with the Affordable Care Act.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently mandated a “black-box warning” be placed on every tanning bed, advising against minors’ use of the devices.

Current Maryland state laws require parental consent for minors younger than 18 to use tanning services, in line with at least 17 other states. Howard County laws ban minors under 18 from tanning services, as do 11 states and the District of Columbia.

Referencing other FDA rules and restrictions, Luke Golueke, owner of Aruba Sun & Spa, which has several locations in Maryland, said that there was no need to add another layer to an industry that has been compliant with strict regulation and oversight.

Lobbyist Bruce Bereano, representing the Maryland Indoor Tanning Association and SunSeekers, said that an outright ban, as the bill proposes, would interfere with parent-child relationships, while the current parental consent rules for minors encourages communication.

--Deidre McPhillips

- See more at: http://baltimore.citybizlist.com/article/242262/bill-to-ban-indoor-tanning-by-minors-draws-large-crowds-controversy#sthash.vOb5Vj9l.dpuf

Four full panels testified in favor of a bill that would ban minors younger than 18 from the use of tanning facilities, in a standing-room-only chamber of the House Health and Government Operations Committee on Thursday.

This is the third session that Delegate Kirill Reznik, D-Montgomery, has introduced the bill. He said that he intends to help people develop better habits, not to put the tanning industry out of business or be mean to teenagers.

“How often does every medical organization and CareFirst (Medical Health Insurance) line up on the same side of an issue,” he said, citing the extensive support for the legislation banning minors from the “human panini presses.”

Delegate Clarence Lam, D-Baltimore and Howard, testified as a practicing doctor in favor of the bill. UV rays are more potent as a carcinogen to children than to adults, he said.

A 10 percent tax was imposed on tanning services nationwide with the Affordable Care Act.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently mandated a “black-box warning” be placed on every tanning bed, advising against minors’ use of the devices.

Current Maryland state laws require parental consent for minors younger than 18 to use tanning services, in line with at least 17 other states. Howard County laws ban minors under 18 from tanning services, as do 11 states and the District of Columbia.

Referencing other FDA rules and restrictions, Luke Golueke, owner of Aruba Sun & Spa, which has several locations in Maryland, said that there was no need to add another layer to an industry that has been compliant with strict regulation and oversight.

Lobbyist Bruce Bereano, representing the Maryland Indoor Tanning Association and SunSeekers, said that an outright ban, as the bill proposes, would interfere with parent-child relationships, while the current parental consent rules for minors encourages communication.

--Deidre McPhillips

- See more at: http://baltimore.citybizlist.com/article/242262/bill-to-ban-indoor-tanning-by-minors-draws-large-crowds-controversy#sthash.vOb5Vj9l.dpuf

Four full panels testified in favor of a bill that would ban minors younger than 18 from the use of tanning facilities, in a standing-room-only chamber of the House Health and Government Operations Committee on Thursday.

This is the third session that Delegate Kirill Reznik, D-Montgomery, has introduced the bill. He said that he intends to help people develop better habits, not to put the tanning industry out of business or be mean to teenagers.

“How often does every medical organization and CareFirst (Medical Health Insurance) line up on the same side of an issue,” he said, citing the extensive support for the legislation banning minors from the “human panini presses.”

Delegate Clarence Lam, D-Baltimore and Howard, testified as a practicing doctor in favor of the bill. UV rays are more potent as a carcinogen to children than to adults, he said.

A 10 percent tax was imposed on tanning services nationwide with the Affordable Care Act.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently mandated a “black-box warning” be placed on every tanning bed, advising against minors’ use of the devices.

Current Maryland state laws require parental consent for minors younger than 18 to use tanning services, in line with at least 17 other states. Howard County laws ban minors under 18 from tanning services, as do 11 states and the District of Columbia.

Referencing other FDA rules and restrictions, Luke Golueke, owner of Aruba Sun & Spa, which has several locations in Maryland, said that there was no need to add another layer to an industry that has been compliant with strict regulation and oversight.

Lobbyist Bruce Bereano, representing the Maryland Indoor Tanning Association and SunSeekers, said that an outright ban, as the bill proposes, would interfere with parent-child relationships, while the current parental consent rules for minors encourages communication.

--Deidre McPhillips

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